Tracy Do: Silver Lake’s top home sale of 2017

A Colonial Revival-style home that sold in September takes the cake for the most expensive home sale in Silver Lake this year.

Formerly owned by noted artist and illustrator Pauline Annon, the 1930s home catches the eye from the street with its classic red-brick façade and white trim around the front door. Contemporary updates fill the 3,280 square feet of living space, which has three bedrooms and 3.5 bathrooms. Amenities include a formal dining room, remodeled kitchen, wine cellar and screening room. Balconies, including one attached to the master suite, feature mountain views.

Tracy Do of Compass was the listing agent.
Read the rest of the story in the Real Estate section of the LA Times.

Thank you  Los Angeles Times for featuring our sale of this stunning red brick Colonial home –  we are so proud to have sold it for the highest price recorded in the Silver Lake in 2017. A remarkable property led to a remarkable transaction, and we are so honored to share this success. We were delighted to assist the seller in the acquisition and sale of this rare masterpiece – if you are thinking of buying or selling a property, we are here to help.

Sold in September 2017 for $2.5 million.

 

 

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A New Year and A New Home

The New Year is a time of fresh starts and new beginnings – and nothing says “a new beginning” better than a brand new home. We are beyond thrilled to represent the E.R.B. Homes, a collection of residences that are innovative in design and eco-friendly in their small-lot footprint – helping make LA a cleaner, better city. Set in the idyllic neighborhood of Eagle Rock, these modern homes have 100% structural independence, meaning you won’t have any shared walls, and won’t ever need to worry about “air rights” – because when you purchase a home at the E.R.B. you will own everything, including the walls and the ground beneath you.

What are people excited about when they come to visit the E.R.B.? So many things, starting with the great location at the junction of Eagle Rock and Highland Park. Both neighborhoods have earned countless accolades for their bevy of artisanal eateries and stylish boutiques, but it is Eagle Rock that LA.Eater, our local foodie compass, recently named as Emerging As One of LA’s Hottest Culinary Destinations. We’ve been keeping a close watch on the local favorites over at the E.R.B. instagram account – be sure to follow us to keep up to date.

With prices starting at $795,900, homes at The E.R.B. cost less than comparable resale homes in Eagle Rock, and offer so much for your money. Each home enjoys an expansive layout of approximately 1,800 square feet of living space that includes 3 bedrooms, 2.5 bathrooms, a flex space, a private two-car garage and a rooftop deck – your spot for leisurely gatherings and starlit soirees with friends and family. The views are gorgeous, especially at twilight, when the San Gabriel Mountains are cast in the most wonderful colors and the neighborhood panorama is aglow with city lights. Another appealing factor about the E.R.B. are the mixed-use spaces, which allow the residents’ businesses become a part of the community. We are so excited that Silk Jade Tea, a purveyor of fine teas, is opening a shop in one of storefronts.

The E.R.B. homes are selling fast – but there is still time to reserve your new home. If you do, you’ll be able to move in this coming Spring. Take advantage of early access and builder incentives, which can be used in the Design Center as you customize your brand new home.

Keep in mind that the E.R.B. is under construction; homes are ready to be reserved to qualified buyers on a first-come, first-served basis. We’d love to show you around – contact us at 323-842-4002 or info@theerb.com if you have any questions or to schedule your very own private “hard hat” tour.

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The Makings of a Home : a Scandi Perspective

What makes a happy life? This question, central to all human experience, is timeless and perpetually relevant. While the connection may not be immediately apparent, the search for answers to this query often does consider the ‘where’ of life — and, thus, can involve real estate. Having a home of one’s own — a space for for nesting, for safety, for the self and family — is widely accepted as an important factor in living well. So, what makes a happy home? Different eras in histories have proposed various theories; each contemporary culture provides its version of an answer.

Today, we focus on the Scandinavian. These Northern European interior concepts are enjoying much attention and popularity this year, with Hygge and Lagom books becoming coffee-table staples around the world. As we get ready to turn over the new leaf of 2018, let us examine the many philosophies that can contribute to the creation, construction, and care of a ‘cozy’ home. As the Swedish proverb goes:  “Borta bra men hemma bäst” — “Away is good but home is best”.

 

THE DANISH HYGGE

© Country Living UK

Hygge is a Danish term that brings to mind a merry mood of comfortable conviviality, complete with feelings of wellness and contentment. Revealed about a year ago as the “secret to Danish happiness”, Hygge inspires its followers to savor each and every minute, spend more time at home, read books while nestled in blankets of merino wool, meditate while counting the snowflakes as they cascade outside the window (… or, if you live in Los Angeles, perhaps opt instead to count the palms on the horizon). Hygge also calls upon us to appreciate what we have right now and to seek happiness in the simple things of life. Adherents of the Hygge approach tend to spend more money on “life experiences” than on purchases, eliminate clutter and all that is unnecessary, invest trust in unfamiliar people, and work on developing our inherent inner strengths that will allow us to change our life for the better.

Hygge and its principles have made quite an impression on residents of Denmark. Its followers are convinced that prioritizing the home leads to happiness — and advocates of the Hygge concept espouse that the cultivation of a “home, sweet home” can improve life in numerous, surprising, and uplifting ways.

How to achieve a Hygge paradise at your own home:

• Decorate minimally, by displaying only things that hold personal value and emotional connection for you; hang up a photo from a memorable trip, place out a ceramic hand-made by a friend, display a token of affection given to you by a relative.

• Select furniture pieces with clean and simple lines, in a calming color scheme.

• Creative patterns for maximum cozy appeal:  consider a throw on the armchair, or a pair of beautifully printed curtains.

• Include a place to gather the whole family:  a large dining table, awaiting the next holiday feast; or a roomy sofa in the living room to lounge on with friends.

 

THE SWEDISH LAGOM

© My Scandinavian Home

Following in the footsteps of Hygge’s incredible success, the Swedish phenomenon of Lagom has also begun to capture the imagination of home-owners. As in the case of Hygge, Lagom does not have an exact English translation:  its meaning falls somewhere near to concepts of “just the right amount”, “golden mean”, and “in balance”.

When we Americans think of Swedish design, we can’t help but think of IKEA — and the pragmatic concept of Lagom is very much a part of what makes this epic Swedish furniture giant an international success. The 2017 IKEA catalog is titled “Live Lagom”, further popularizing the term and introducing this philosophy through the prism of the products it offers.

To practice Lagom is to maintain a sense of balance, comfort, and practicality. A “lagomer” passes up luxury in order to be closer to nature, and, therefore, maintains a humble countenance — would a truly peaceful and happy person need to shout about it to the whole world? It is enough to be at home, in still tranquility.

Lagom in the interior:

• Furniture items in the home should not be disposable or change with the seasons; buy sturdy and dependable pieces that will last for many years and age alongside you.

• Employ simple design solutions, include minimal decorations, and maximize free space.

• Opt for a muted color palette to promote serenity.

• Purchase lush bedspreads, blankets, and sheepskins that you can disappear into, snugly and safely.

 

THE NORWEGIAN FRILUFTSLIV

© Nyde

Freedom, nature, life — these are the most important components in the Norwegian philosophy of Friluftsliv. Norwegians claim that the word “Friluftsliv” captures the essence of the Norwegian soul, suggesting a ”life in the open air” that emphasizes the wonders of the outdoors and encourages a comfortable environment where living and thinking come breezily. For the Norwegians, the landscape represents an important spiritual anchor of the national culture.

Friluftsliv has not yet attained the level of popularity enjoyed by Hygge and Lagom, but we think its ethos is quite close to the way we feel about nature here in Southern California:  Friluftsliv is intimately and conceptually linked to the environment, and promotes human care for nature — drawing, in response, inspiration from this nature. We Californians are known for our similar outlook, which makes us, in our sunny way, Friluftsliv-ers ourselves.

Make Yours A Friluftsliv Home:

• Decorate with arrangements of wooden branches, carefully laid firewood, and various DIY-compositions.

• Integrate natural materials into the interiors:  for instance, a stump can make a great stool — or can a wall be overlaid with logs to suggest a forest den?

• Bring nature indoors:  surround yourself with plants, cultivating herbs in the kitchen, flowers on the porch, leafing greenery in the living room.

• Swap heavy drapes for gauze curtains to let in the sunlight and expand the interior space.

 

THE FINNISH SISU

Photo: Arsi Ikäheimonen / Courtesy of Linda Bergroth

Not to be outdone by its neighboring countries, Finland, too, is investigating happiness in the home, turning to a unique local approach called the Sisu, a point of national pride. The Sisu is not yet widely known, but the concept has every chance of making it to the headlines of lifestyle magazines in the coming year. Get ahead of the curve and get some Sisu into your home ASAP!

The concept of Sisu stands for will, determination, perseverance, and rational action in the face of adversity. It is summed up in the old Finnish saying:  ”What needs to be done will be done, no matter what”. This reliable, if stoic, philosophy has flourished in response to the harsh climate of some parts of Finland; the Finnish people responded with an uncharacteristic take on Scandinavian minimalism. The result is an unexpectedly colorful style of design, especially evident in the bright palette of national textiles often placed out for viewing.

The Sisu Tenets:

• Bring in timeless objects:  nothing is too old; if it is dear to you, it should be on display.

• Embrace the rainbow:  splashes of color and bright accents; colorful ceramics; patterned weavings.

• Home-made rugs are often found in the Finnish interior; they also are a source of national pride.

• Finally, one can never go wrong with a decent supply of licorice sweets in the kitchen.


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We hope this short survey of Scandi design ideas is helpful as you re-imagine your home and design your ideal haven for the new year. Whether your goal is to live in the now (Hygge); achieve balance and harmony (Lagom); embody the inspiring landscape surrounding you (Friluftsliv); or celebrate heritage through craft, pattern, and textile (Sisu) — integrating one (or more) of these philosophies into your home may be just the key to bringing on more joy in other areas of your life. Let your home reflect your values; it is your sanctuary, and — as the Scandinavians have shown us — you can live your philosophy through your design choices.

As always, if you are searching for that perfect place to call your home — so that you can delve into decorating accordingly — do get in touch! We are just an email or phone call away. We do believe that a happy home contributes to a happy life; we are confident we can help you find the right place to help you on this path.

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Holiday Gifts and Art Collecting in Los Angeles

Tis the season of gifting, but the sheer mass of choices out there can often make this an overwhelming pursuit. If you are still pondering what you might present to your loved ones, we think you can’t go wrong with art – a great investment and a wonderful way to adorn your home. Alternately, a gift that has a philanthropic component is always a great choice.

Los Angeles has been in the news as one of the top cities for the arts – recently superseding New York in that regard, so take advantage of your location and get your hands on some original works.

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ARTIST HOLIDAYS MARKET

Amanda Ross-Ho

Taking place in Frogtown, near Atwater Village, this holiday market is organized by artist Despina Stokou, who opened up her spacious studio to for a one afternoon pop-up shop. Expect to find paintings, sculpture, ceramics, jewellery, prints and editions, artists’ books, and more, by artists ranging from emerging to established. Hungry shoppers will be provided with beer, vegan tamales, wurst and cookies, and parents will get a hand with childcare.

WHERE: 2405 Glover Place 90031
WHEN: Saturday 16th December 1-6pm
home brewed beer, Würste, Tacos, Art, Stuff
5$ suggested donation at the door
childcare provided upon request via Facebook event.

with Amanda Ross-Ho, Erik Frydenborg, Cassandra Press, Alice Lang, Anabell Juarez, Kathryn O’ Halloran, Ry Rocklen, Pilar Wiley, Stephanie Guerrero and Daniel Gibson, Forrest, Yelena Zhelezov, Agnes Bolt, Despina Stokou, Jason Burgess, Amelia Steely, Spencer Lewis, Shelley Holcomb, Theresa Sterner, Jonny Coleman and lots more.

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Keith Rocka Knittel’s EVERYTHING MUST GO! HOLIDAY BAZAAR

Keith Rocka Knittel, courtesy of Angels Gate Art

One more fun art market happening on Saturday is Keith Rocka Knittel’s “Everything Must Go! Holiday Bazaar”, held at the Charlie James Gallery in Chinatown. The event is a part of the exhibition WE’RE ALL EQUALLY UNIMPORTANT, presenting new work by Keith Rocka Knittel that opens the same evening.

The Holiday Bazaar will feature artists Michael Decker, Chris Hanke, Sarah Manuwal, Alli Miller, Carl Pomposelli, Molly Shea, and Lena Wolek, who, along with Keith Rocka Knittel, will be selling art objects.  Additionally, cocktails will be served by Bar-fund and holiday pies and treats by Northern Organics will be for sale. Rocka Knittel will also present a installation of works by participating Bazaar artists and Max Maslansky and Dylan Palmer in the downstairs gallery, echoing a church basement after the bazaar has ended but before the janitor cleans up.

WHEN: Saturday, December 16, from 6-9PM
WHERE: 969 Chung King Rd, Los Angeles, CA 90012

“Arbitrator’s Clauset” by Lena Wolek (image courtesy of Egyptian Arts & Antiques Gallery)

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NOWSPACE + CENTRAL PARK SILENT AUCTION

Another great opportunity to purchase art and support Los Angeles artists is the silent benefit auction organized by NowSpace (an artist-run exhibition space located in El Sereno) in conjunction with Central Park Gallery. The proceeds from the auction will benefit projects and programming for both spaces in 2018, with funds going towards expanding programming and providing small grants to resident artists.

WHEN: Friday, December 15th, 6 – 11 pm
WHERE: 5390 Alhambra Ave.

Panamint Range from Panamint Valley Rd. by Makenzie Goodman & Adam Stacey

If you are unable to attend the live auction, bidding is also be open online at the online auction site, head over here to preview the works.

We hope you find some fabulous pieces to add to your collection, and most importantly, have lots of fun. If and when your art collection gets too large for your current home, contact us –  we would love to help. Get in touch with us here and follow our Instagram to keep up to date with our listings.

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A Modern Take on the Time-Honored Tradition: Sustainable Holiday Decor

The holiday season is here, complete with its telltale signs, decorations, and festivities. The gorgeous smells of pine, ginger, and cinnamon waft through Los Angeles neighborhoods, each street aglow with colorful lights. Dreidels, advent calendars, and luxurious chocolates of every kind are suddenly appearing on the shelves of your favorite market. No doubt about it — it’s time to deck the halls! This year, we are particularly inspired by the concept of “less is more”, and thinking about sustainable practices in decorating. We’ve scoured the great expanses of the web for the best minimalist and environmentally friendly adornments to be found. Here are some ideas we think you’ll love!

PLAYFUL AND FUN,

this geometric dowel “tree” is sustainably made and has a fresh and modern look. An easy DIY project – here’s Martha Stewart showing how it’s done – you can make this a family activity by building it with your loved ones and creating lasting memories together. If you are short on time or don’t possess a drill you can get a ready-to-assemble dowel tree on Etsy.

 

A FEW PINE BRANCHES

and a couple of clear jars (is it wrong to assume that most of us in LA have attempted to brew Kombucha at one point of our lives? That Kombucha brewing jar would be perfect!) and you have a joyously festive evergreen bouquet that resonates with tradition and makes use of the discarded branches at your local tree market. Decorate with small, bright baubles or try making these charming Mid-Century paper lantern ornaments.

 

A SILHOUETTE

defines the graceful design of this Christmas tree design, drawn with a chalk. There is a fleeting beauty to this tree idea – appearing, as though by magic, on your wall in December, it disappears without a trace after the holiday season.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A POTTED MINI TREE

is a great sustainable Christmas tree option  –  you can decorate your charming sapling year after year at holiday season until it needs to be permanently planted outdoors.

 

ETHERIAL WINTER

vibes radiate from this composition of shapely branches, painted white and decorated with clear glass and stars. Get the “White Christmas” look by picking up a few tree-limbs on your morning hike, and stopping by your local thrift store for a couple of recycled baubles.

 

A CARDBOARD TREE

is there a more perfect canvas for ornamentation by painting than this recycled cardboard tree made in California? No, there is not. Purchase on Etsy  or make your own with this simple template.

 

A HANNUKAH WREATH

We love the design of this Star of David wreath made with local flora. Just add a string of LED’s for a sparkly look worthy of the Festival of Lights!

 

MAKE A BEAUTIFUL MENORAH

with this tutorial from Martha Stewart – all you need is a 16 inches long branch, a drill and a bit of craft paint.

A GARLAND OF GELT

Decorate your mantelpiece with a garland made of chocolate coins. Sustainable, because you and your family can (and should) eat them by the time the holiday is over.

 

DRAW THE LIGHTS

Chalkboard Menorah Sign allows you to celebrate each night of Hanukkah by drawing a flame on each candle – so fun and safe for the young ones in the family. Found over at Peace.Love. Bright and very inspiring!

 

GO MID-CENTURY MODERN

by tying  a few hula-hoops together with some string and ribbon to make a Christmas chandelier/tree, as inspired by this classic 1964 design originally created by Lawrence “Bud” Stoecker and recently recreated by his grandson, Matthew Bliss. Afterwards, stop by the iconic Stahl House (find more info about their tours here) and enjoy taking in the sparkling and festive panorama of lights stretching all the way to the horizon.

 

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Things to do in LA this Thanksgiving Weekend

The vast Thanksgiving meal is behind us, and the future looks festive and bright! Illuminated as much by the LA sun as by the twinkling holiday lights that traditionally appear after the day of thanks, there is no doubt that the winter holidays are swiftly approaching and it’s time to venture out into the world.

Here are some city happenings that we are excited about for this long weekend; as usual, there is no shortage of events in our fair town, for which we are very thankful indeed!

SHOP LOCAL
Support Los Angeles artists and crafters while doing your holiday shopping by purveying the annual Handmade LA marketplace , held at the Craft & Folk Art Museum this Saturday and Sunday. Expect to have a wide choice of handmade gifts and get the added bonus of meeting the artists behind the goods.

Post Studio’s Isac Placemats are inspired by the iconic parallel lines of Shibuya Crossing.

On Sunday, Smorgasburg launches their Holiday Market in Downtown LA this Sunday –  in addition to delicious treats there will be vendors offering handcrafted presents. The holiday market will occur every Sunday from December 3-17, the official launch on November 26 will feature flash sales and specials from 10 to 11AM so get there early.

SNOW DAY LA
Venture into a snowy wonderland mood without leaving town: head to Elysian Park to partake in whimsical winter pleasures such as tubing and skating over at Snow Day LA. Sounds incredible? We live in a magical city.

photo by DTLAexplorer.com

LACMA
One of the best museums in California, LACMA offers a wealth of programming at any given time. With its many pavilions and lush outdoor spaces, the museum feels like a miniature city, replete with activities for every hour of the day. Begin your visit by contemplating the incredible Marc Chagall exhibit, dine on gourmet farm-to-table cuisine at Ray’s & Stark Bar and conclude your experience with – Friday Jazz at LACMA series: a veteran saxophonist and arranger Kim Richmond and his septet will pay homage to the classic works of Herbie Hancock and Joni Mitchell along with songs from Richmond’s latest recording, Inner Spirit.

Chagall: Fantasies for the Stage | LACMA

ENCHANTED: A FOREST OF LIGHT
Get a luminous start on the sparkling Holiday Seasons by visiting the stunning light installation at Descanso Garden, Enchanted: Forest of Light. An annual event, this year’s display is especially striking and enrapturing, a breathtaking exposition with a multitude of atmospheric effects, light sculptures, and uplit trees. Meander, discover, and be enchanted…

SOMETHING DIFFERENT
Combine love of the ocean with art and fashion, and travel beachside to take part in “Tailor Made: A Pop-Up Alterations Shop with Frau Fiber” at Camera Obscura Art Lab at 1450 Ocean, where artist Frau Fiber presents a pop-up alterations shop providing mending, alteration and tailoring services. The twist: each customer spins the Wheel of Wages to determine the cost of service. The wheel is divided into countries that produce the bulk of our fast fashion garments.

Tailor Made: A Pop-Up Alterations Shop with Frau Fiber

STAYCATION
If you feel perfectly cozy where you are, a new TV show, Godless, caught our eye. Set in 1884 in Colorado, in a town run by women, it sounds like an innovative feminist take on a classic Western plot. The miniseries are said to be spellbinding, and those that liked Downton Abbey will enjoy the appearance of Michelle Dockery. Here’s to more popcorn and snug, relaxing evenings!

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Inspired by the fall: our favorite soup spots

Even though snow is not on our weather menu here in Los Angeles, it does get rather chilly in the autumn and winter, particularly in the evenings. As the sun sets and the shadows gather, the best course of action to keep warm is to have some delicious soup. Luckily, we live in foodie heaven, and there are infinite options for this heartwarming dish in every neighborhood we serve, be it Silver Lake, Los Feliz, Highland Park, Mt. Washington, or the Valley. Here are some recent favorites that we would love to recommend:

PINE AND CRANE

If you are in Silver Lake, head to Pine and Crane to savor the steamy goodness of the fragrant Taiwanese beef noodle soup.  Served in beautiful artisan ceramic bowl, it’s packs an aromatic punch, and is certain to help you power through the holiday season.

GOOD GIRL DINETTE

Providing liquid bliss to the residents of Highland Park for the last 5 years is the local favorite Good Girl Dinette. Headed by the visionary chef Diep Tran, who aptly defined the restaurant as  “American diner meets Vietnamese comfort food,” Good Girl Dinette feels chic and bohemian while serving amazing Pho ( vegetarian options available) and yummy, hearty bowls of Porridge.

RAMEN BANGAICHI

If you are hunkering for a bowl of ramen, Ramen Bangaichi of Silver Lake offers a flavorful rendition of this beloved Japanese dish. Established 50 years ago in Tokyo, Japan, the first Bangaichi restaurant was located at the Tokyo Railway Station, near the Imperial Palace grounds and the Ginza commercial district, and we feel pretty fortunate that it came to Los Feliz. We recommend Ginger Ramen, a delicious collage of char-siu pork, bamboo shoots, green onions, bean sprouts, and a fair dash of ginger, to comfort the spirit and sooth the soul.

TAIX

Taix, an Echo Park stalwart, was established in 1927 and has been operated by three generations of the Taix family. The sprawling interior includes a large dining hall and a cozy bar area with retro ambiance that’s appreciated by a diverse demographic – you are equally likely to encounter a multi-generational family or a flock of the young and hip (particularly on Wednesday evenings, when local artists take over the bar for “Social Club”, a night of DJ’ing and socializing). The daily soups range from Minestrone to Clam Chowder, with the Onion Soup classic in rotation throughout the week. Settle down into a soft armchair and enjoy your abundant tureen of French country cuisine as you watch the fireplace and feel your worries melt away.

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The many lives of the Arts District

We are pretty excited about our upcoming loft listing in the Arts District and thought this would be a great opportunity to revisit the area’s fascinating history that spans from agrarian endeavors to performance art.

The tall majestic San Gabriel Mountains stand in the far background. Vineyards blanket the area between the City and the L.A. River (lower right).

It seems incredible to imagine, but in the mid-nineteenth century, the concrete expanse that we now know as the Arts District was a flourishing vineyard. Entitled El Aliso, the vineyard was planted by Jean-Louis Vignes, who arrived in Pueblo de Los Angeles from France in 1831. Within a mere 20 years, he had become the largest producer of wine in California and the first person to plant an orange grove in LA. Inspired by Vignes, additional citrus growers moved into the area. All this industrious production required transportation, so a network of railroads sprung up to accommodate the shipping needs. In turn, the presence of these railroads attracted further manufacturing  — thus, the industrial architecture designed to optimize production gradually moved in and replaced the orchards.

 

1897. “Young boys fill a small gasoline powered streetcar of the ‘Mateo Street & Santa Fe Ave. Street Car Co.’ seen traveling on an unpaved Santa Fe Avenue at 9th Street.”

Taking advantage of the many rail depots, by the 1910s and 1920s, the Arts District was teeming with businesses producing rubber, auto parts, and furniture. The Barker Brothers Building, where we sold two loft residencies this year, actually used to be a furniture factory. As Los Angeles grew and incorporated the outlying communities of Highland Park, Eagle Rock, and Boyle Heights, the city of LA zoned the Arts District for industrial uses. This seemed to seal the city’s fate as an array of warehouses and factories. However, by the end of WW2, things had shifted once again.

An aerial view dated 1924 of the Barker Bros. factory and warehouses. Image via Los Angeles Public Library Photo Collection.

As industrial needs evolved, railroads began to be eclipsed by the  large trucks – and those had difficulty the infrastructure built with railroads  in mind. Manufacturing began to move away to other neighborhoods, and the disused warehouse spaces began to decline.  By 1970s, artists started moving into the  abandoned buildings,  turning them into live/work studios and opening galleries. By the 1980s the former manufacturing hub was a bustling art scene, and the city passed a new ordinance that allowed artists to legally continue in their old factories and commercial buildings.

A look back at the corner of Broadway and Third Street, just in front of the Million Dollar Theater in 1972. (Los Angeles Times)

By the mid 1980s, the artists’ community was huge –  Merion Estes, Marnie Weber Joe Fay, George Herms, Mary Jones, Constance Mallinson, Paul McCarthy, Lari Pittman, John Schroeder, Judy Simonian, Andy Wilf, and Takako Yamaguchi all lived downtown. It was these artists, and the spaces they opened – like LACE (Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions), PØST gallery,  Al’s Bar on Traction Avenue, ARCO Center for Visual Art on Flower Street and others, that gave Arts District its name. In words of the LA Times critic, William Wilson written in 1985: “Nothing in recent years has so beguiled the indigenous cultural imagination as the vision of downtown Los Angeles transformed into a glittering art Mecca.”

A view of an exhibition staged by LACE at the old Cotton Exchange building in downtown Los Angeles in 1984. (LACE (Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions))

As art hubs moved to Chinatown and beyond in late 1990’s and 2000’s, the formerly industrial spaces continued to be adaptively reused and redeveloped – case in point is the beautiful Toy Factory Building, the location of the exquisite loft residence we are about to bring on the market, and all the revitalized spaces nearby, such as Urban Radish Market, Daily Dose Coffee, Church & State, Bestia, and Hauser & Wirth, and Sprueth Mager galleries, and many more – offering artful nourishment for the body and soul amidst the heart of Los Angeles history.

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Thank you, Silver Lake!

The Tracy Do Real Estate team is so honored to be voted The Best in Real Estate for the 4th year in a row. We love the vibrant neighborhood of Silver Lake and are so grateful for your support. It makes us incredibly happy to be a part of this amazing community.

We love all the Eastside neighborhoods we work in, helping people buy and sell homes in Los Feliz, Echo Park, Highland Park, Eagle Rock and Mt. Washington – but we will always hold a special place in our hearts for Silver Lake. It was there that in 2002 Tracy Do began her journey in real estate, assisting her first client with a purchase of a lovely mid-century home in the beautiful Silver Lake neighborhood of Moreno Highlands. Since that time, the Tracy Do team has grown – becoming the leader in real estate sales throughout the Eastside and setting a standard of innovative excellence that yields measurable results for our clients.

just sold in Silver Lake | 1800 SILVERWOOD TERRACE

The Tracy Do team is committed to representing properties in the most advantageous way and negotiating the very best terms for our clients. All our agents are passionate about real estate and work hard to manifest our clients’ home dreams into reality. Our team is deeply rooted in Eastside Los Angeles and is considered to be the top realtors across Silver Lake, Highland Park, Los Feliz, Eagle Rock, Mt. Washington, Atwater Village, and beyond. Living in the neighborhoods we service gives us the insight and expertise to provide the best advice to our clients as they navigate the Los Angeles real estate market.

buy a home in silver lake

home for sale in Silver Lake |1225 MANZANITA ST

 

We are honored by the trust that the Silver Lake community placed in us by voting us the best in Real Estate. If you are thinking about buying or selling a property, we would love to help.  Call or text us anytime at 323-842-4001, send us a message here or follow our Instagram.

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Tracy Do Real Estate tips for adopting pets in Los Angeles

A futuristic way to have a fluffy friend if you suffer from allergies, if your HOA does not allow pets, or if you’d like your new smart home features to extend to cushions, found on Kickstarter and made us smile:

“Qoobo is a robotic cushion with a tail intended to provide a sense of comfort to users. When caressed, it waves gently. When rubbed, it swings playfully. And it occasionally wags just to say hello. It’s a comforting communication that warms your heart the way that animals do. Qoobo intrigues me because the shape of the tail and the ways it moves just bring a smile to my face. When you are stressed, I think this could comfort you and heal you. It’s a refreshing concept to have humans and robots communicate only through tail movements — without relying on sounds or facial expressions.”

This innovative “pet” is currently in development by Yukai engineering, but there seems to be enough enthusiasm for the project to meet their Kickstarter fundrasing goal of of $43,884. Thus far, $47,004 has been pledged by 397 backers, and the first Qoobos should be available for purchase in June 2018.

If a “pet pillow” feels too unusual or possibly too spooky (Halloween IS just a week away!) and you would rather bring home an adorable pup or a cute kitten, we definitely recommend that you visit an animal shelter. If you live in Atwater, Santé D’Or Foundation is a wonderful animal shelter that does an amazing job of rescuing animals and nurturing them in an welcoming, kind way. A team of animal-loving volunteers works with the animals seven days a week and — unlike most shelters — the animals at Santé D’Orin Atwater Village are free to roam and play all day.

© thedogcafela.com

For those that live in Los Feliz or Silver Lake, The Dog Cafe is a great place to look into – run by a team of dedicated volunteers, this is a dog cafe where you can play, get to know, and adopt a pet in a casual, relaxed setting. You have to make a reservation, and for $15/hour you get a drink and 60 min of playtime with puppies that are in need of a home.

Jordan E. | Monrovia | via yelp.com

If you are a resident of Echo Park, Ken-Mar Rescue is a great choice if you are planning to adopt a dog. Founded in 2007 by a pair of dog lovers, Ken Guild and Martie Petrie, this shelter has a great team that provides excellent care for their rescues – each dog receives a personality and behavioral evaluation and veterinary care care it needs upon arrival at Ken-Mar. The Echo Park non-profit is dedicated to find the proper homes for all their pets and give a future to as many needy pets as possible.

A new pet is much like an addition to a family – some adjustments are required and home environment and neighborhood are important to consider – check out this piece for advice on dog and home ownership that interviews Tracy Do, over at Real Estate section of US News, and get in touch if you need assistance with buying or selling your home.

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